Radio & Safety

SALTWATER FISHING & TRICKS

Anchoring

1. Anchoring — situating a boat over a reef or in swift current, for example — is one of the most diffi-cult maneuvers in fishing. However, proper equipment will make a difficult job more manageable.

2. Start with an anchor rope that is at least five times as long as the depth of the water, a section of chain that equals the length of the boat and an anchor that will dig into the bottom. The tricky part comes when positioning the boat over a structure:

3. Pull the boat directly over the structure.

4. Take it out of gear and drift away.·

5. Using the GPS and compass, return past· the structure using the same course as when you drifted away.

6. The tricky part comes when predicting how far up wind and up current to deploy the anchor:

7. Pull ahead of the structure far enough· to let the anchor hit the bottom and dig into the sub-strate.

8. Once the boat comes to rest, let out or· pull in anchor line to properly position the boat. Be sure to leave enough scope in the line so that the boat and rise and fall on the waves.

9. To pull the anchor, take up slack in the line until the rope is straight up and down. Then cleat off the line and motor the boat ahead slowly to free the hook.

10. Freeing snagged lures and rigs

11. Losing tackle to snags is frustrating, time consuming and expensive. With a little patience and fi-nesse, the rig can usually be freed from the structure. When you detect your lure or rig has be-come snagged, set the reel in freespool to prevent digging the hook deeper into the snag. Then, run the boat past the structure in the opposite direction the hook was snagged. Tighten the line and jerk the rod tip to free the hook. Bottom fishermen will often use a lighter leader to their sinkers so they can easily break off a snagged weight without losing their whole rig.

12. Finding Wrecks, Reef and Other Structures

13. One good way to find fish is to find the structure where they live. The best place to look for these structures is on a nautical chart. Several companies make special charts with popular wrecks, reefs and other fishing areas marked and coordinates noted. Artificial reefs will be documented by the organizations that sponsored them. Local tackle shops will often have publications that list the coordinates of hotspots. Dive shops and clubs are also good sources of information on area reefs.

 

Boat owners/Skippers please note:

Following recent enquiries regarding bouyancy certificates and the validity thereof, Sydney Strydom has clarified the issue with SAMSA and has available copies of SAMSA Marine Notice 8 of 2012 (dd 29March 2012) which pertains to this issue.


What Safety Stuff Do You Need to have onboard your boat?

Safety equipment requirements for boats vary by the size of your boat and the Merchant Shipping Act, 1951 and amended regulations of 2007.

The required safety equipment will vary according to your Survey category. For 1, 5,15 or 40nm. Here are some of the required items, but are not limited to these only.


1. Life Jackets PFD's

Have properly fitting life jackets aboard for all passengers. Note that these have a maximum bearable weight.

Drowning is the number-one boat-related accident. Boat owners are required to carry personal flotation devices (PFDs) for each person on board at all times. Children under 12 years of age are required to wear an approved PFD unless below deck. Life jackets must be the appropriate size for both adult and children. Follow instructions on how to put your life jacket on correctly.


2. Distress Signals and other equipment

Category B 40 nautical miles

 

Category C 15 nautical miles

 

Category D 5 nautical miles

 

Category E 1 nautical miles

 

Category R inland waters

 

All boats  to have the category as  a suffix on the end of the WP number ( WP 007B)

 

 

B

C

D

E

R

Approved life jacket per person SABS approved

x

x

x

x

x

Projectile flare set

 

 

 

x

 

Hand-held red distress flares

4

2

2

 

 

Four red rocket parachute flares

4

2

2

 

 

Floating orange  smoking marker

x

x

x

 

 

Hand held orange  smoking marker

 

 

 

x

 

One sound signalling device (other than a life jacket whistle)

x

x

x

 

 

Permanently fitted radar reflector 400mm only vessels 9m or more

x

x

x

x

 

Marine VHF radio or 29 mhz radio

x

x

x

 

 

Suitable approved magnetic compass (with which bearings can be taken)

x

x

x

 

 

Navigation chart for the area of operation

x

x

 

 

 

Suitable approved fire extinguisher 1 per engine

x

x

x

x

x

2x oars or paddles for one engine

 

 

x

x

x

Capsize bottle & rope 1.5 times of vessel length

x

x

x

x

 

Suitable anchor, chain and rope vessel 6 meters and over min 5 meters of chain vessel 6 meters and under min 3 meters of chain

100

100

100

50

 

2 Space blankets

x

x

x

 

 

1 litre of water per person

x

x

x

 

 

First aid kit * If the motor is over 15 HP

x

x

x

x*

 

Suitable air bellow & repair kit only on inflatable

x

x

x

x

x

Spares & tools

x

x

x

x

x

Marking of equipment & trailer

x

x

x

x

x

Emergency steering to be demonstrated (except when fitted with tiller arm)

x

x

x

x

x

Id sheet rectangular sheet at least 2m x width of vessel (orange or yellow)

x

x

x

x

 

Buoyancy as per regulations

x

x

x

x

x

Suitable bailer or bucket for non self-draining decks

 

 

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

 

 

Required extra equipment for night operation skipper to be night rated

 

Appropriate navigation lights

x

x

x

x

x

Water proof torch with spare batteries & bulb

x

x

x

x

x

Illuminated compass

x

x

x

x

x

* If the motor is over 15 HP

 

 

 

 

 

 


3. Throw able Personal Flotation Devices (PFD’s)

Life rings are great for bigger boats in case someone goes overboard.

Boats that are 16 ft. and over are advised to have throw able flotation devices, such as life rings, horseshoes or flotation cushions. Make sure the flotation cushion has two straps. Wearing light colored reflective clothing will make you more visible should you end up going overboard, making it easier for crew to spot you in the water.


4. Fire Extinguisher

The second common and fatal accident on a boat is a fire. Boats with enclosed engines, or fuel tanks that are in a compartment must have a marine approved fire extinguisher. Boats must have a fire extinguisher for each engine on board.


5. Navigation Lights

All boaters boating after sunset are required to have specific navigation lights. Starboard lights are green lights that shine straight ahead and 112.5 degrees down the right side of a boat. The port light is a red light on the left side of the boat that works the same as the starboard light. The masthead lights are white lights on both sides of the bow. The stern light is on both sides of the stern, shining to 67.5 degrees down the side. An anchor light is a white light that shines all around and should be used when a boat is anchored out on the water.


6. Minimum number of persons allowed on a boat.

Skipper + 1.

Maximum number of persons allowed on a boat, will be determined by the % buoyancy built in under the deck, in relation to the combined mass weight of the crew and fuel.

Normally one for every running meter length of boat, but this will be indicated on your Survey certificate.


7. Anchor

Make sure your trip is tied while you are underway from the launch site, this will assist you when you need to put the anchor out in an emergency.

Never try to dislodge a stuck anchor by tying the anchor rope to the stern of the boat, always use the bow to dislodge the anchor, having the boat positioned with the bow facing the oncoming waves.


8. First aid kit (Don’t forget the Panado’s and a bolt cutter may come in handy to remove a treble hook.)


9. Tool kit

Appropriate tool kit with spare parts such as plugs, fuel filters, fuel hose clamps, fuel pumps, tie straps insulation tape and 12v fault finding light, are all useful to have on board. In addition a set of jumper leads.


"Boating is about having fun and enjoying the sea or rivers that you may visit. But driving a boat requires skill and one of the most important jobs for a Skipper is to keep a proper look-out at all times. Look-out for floating debris, hazards like submerged reefs or rocks, Other boats especially kayaks and dinghies, and of course swimmers. You're the skipper, you're responsible and for a good skipper these are good habits."


The History of SADSAA and what it stands for?

In 1957, an organization named the South African Game Fish Association (SAGFA) was formed and catered mainly for anglers fishing from larger game fishing boats in South African waters. At that stage SAGFA had six Provincial bodies and two clubs, the S.A. Marlin and Tuna Club - Simons town and the Natal Rod & Reel Club – Durban who, as founder members, enjoyed full Provincial status.

In October 1958, the South African Ski Boat Angling Association (SASBAA) was formed in the Turfontein Hotel, Johannesburg in the presence of Dave Brunt, Basil Ashington, Leo Rossetenstein and Alf Jones. Alf is still living today. This name was subsequently changed to the S.A. Ski-Boat Light Tackle Game Fishing Association (SASBLTGFA). The name change was the result of the very futuristic vision that (a) Light Tackle was identified as a conservation method and (b) game fish, in being pelagic, was less threatened than bottom fish. This was during the time when South Africa’s 200 mile Economic Zone came into being and it was considered merely a matter of time before a ripple effect would also affect the near- shore areas as we are now experiencing.

After a period of extended negotiations between SAGFA and SASBLTGFA the two organizations amalgamated in 1988 when and the name was once again changed to the present South African Deep Sea Angling Association (SADSAA).

SADSAA is internationally affiliated to the European Federation of Sea Anglers (EFSA) and to the Federation Internationalle de Peche Sportive en Mer (FIPS-M) through its membership to the S.A. Federation of Sport & Sea Angling.


The question now is:

What does SADSAA do for its individual members?

1) Provides for their member bodies to represent them at SADSAA.

2) Provides for members to represent their Province annually on an inter-provincial level as well as on a national level.

3) Provides for members to be selected for SADSAA colours prior to being selected for Protea colours.

4) Provides through I.G.F.A. for members to apply for internationally acclaimed world records.

5) Provides for members to have access to the All Africa records.

6) Provides anglers selected on a national and international (Protea) level with a small percentage of sponsorship from our Springbok fund.

7) Provides the members with suitably qualified selectors to attend all nationals to help with the selection / improvement and development of future Protea anglers.

8) Provides the guidelines for safety regulations for all the member skippers.

9) Provides through qualified instructors the resources to obtain skippers tickets and seaworthy tickets for their members.

10) Provides the training for all safety Officers.

11) Employs paid appointed Specialists working for the members of SADSAA when necessary.

12) Provides for its members, government representation, at all levels.

13) Provides a two page write up six times a year in the Ski-Boat magazine that 90% of the members of SADSAA subscribe to.

14) Provides guidelines for member bodies on the running of their Provinces and in turn the Provinces to the clubs etc.

15) Provides the members with a website updated by the Office Bearers of SADSAA.

16) Provides all clubs with a newsletter from the SADSAA P.R.O. updating them with matters.

17) Provides the members with the infrastructure for contesting matters relating to angling / ski boating etc. E.G.

      * 4x4 banning on beaches

      * Fishing licences

      * Bag limits imposed by the Government etc.

18) Provides the junior angler to represent his/her Province nationally with annual U16 and U19 National Championship tournaments.

19) Provides the opportunity for PDI’s to join and partake in the sport at all levels.

20) Provides the opportunity for women to compete and be recognised on the same level and ability as men for Provincial, National and Protea levels.

21) SADSAA is a member of ILTA, EFSA, CIPS and FIPS which provides opportunities for members and clubs to compete internationally on all levels.

22) Provides all members and member bodies with a Safety Officer, Environmental Officer, Records Officer, Development Officer, Public Relations Officer,

23) Tournaments Officer (both international and local), a Secretary and Treasurer to see to the needs of all member bodies and their members.

24) Most of all SADSAA provides the opportunity to each and every member to belong to a locally and internationally highly respected and motivated association.